‘Rings of Power:’ 7 Aspects of Tolkien’s World Amazon Should Remember

Amazon is fast approaching The Lord of the Rings: The rings of power sparked excitement and intrigue among longtime fans of Tolkien’s books and casual moviegoers. However, with each new trailer, cast interview, and nugget of details about the series’ plot and flow, Amazon seems to be going down an unexpected path with their adaptation of JRR Tolkien work.



Related: 10 Coolest Movie Fantasy Worlds Everyone Wants To VisitThe new series has no obligation to respect peter jacksonfrom Tolkien’s award-winning trilogy. However, there are many themes in which Jackson’s films excelled that Amazon should pick up and, if possible, expose, as well as aspects of the books that deserve attention.

COLLIDER VIDEO OF THE DAY

The PG-13 rating

The team behind rings of power should remember that even if their series does not have to submit to network television censorship, rings of power must remain family. the Lord of the Rings is fantasy like HBO game of thrones, but the tones of the two works are very different. While GoT happily explores dark and adult themes, the Lord of the Rings expressly avoids sexualizing its characters and excess blood and gore.

Throughout the duration of the execution of the LOTR trilogy, only one character is even depicted shirtless – Frodo in Return of the King. Tolkien’s characters aren’t immune to lust and romance, but the story began as a children’s book and isn’t just another fantasy setting.

Honoring the history of Middle-earth

The adage “Those who can’t learn from history are doomed to repeat it” resonates well with Tolkien’s world. rings of power recent trailers suggest that, similar to The Last Jedi, that letting go of the past is the path at least some of their characters seek to follow. All of Tolkien’s books are filled with hymns and poetry immortalizing characters from the past. Aragorn’s journey in LoTR is to remember the faults of one’s ancestors and swear to do better.

Sauron is such a threat to the free people of Middle-earth, partly because they’ve forgotten how terrifying he was and can be again. Should rings of power heroes entertain by forgetting history, that would be deeply at odds with Tolkien’s messages to heed the failures and warnings of the past.

Hope and optimism

Not all fantasy is a dark, dark dystopia, solely focused on fantasy armies and warfare. Tolkien filled his characters with hope for the future, naming Aragorn “Estel”, in Elvish, which translates to “Hope”. Books and movies abound with rousing speeches, often delivered by battlefield kings to their war-weary troops.

Related: 8 Most Realistic CGI Characters In MoviesOne of the most famous monologues in movies is Sam’s speech to Frodo in The two towers. When a hopeless Frodo doubts the success of their journey and wonders what they have left to remember, Sam famously replies, “There is good in this world, Mr. Frodo, and it is worth to fight.”


The sincerity of the cast

Jackson’s movies have very few outright jokes, a good number of them (especially in the extended edition) don’t land. Most of the levity moments are carried by Merry and Pippin. None breaks the immersion of the story. Where many modern films poke fun at their genres and undermine heavy scenes with inappropriate humor, the LOTR trilogy is relentlessly heartfelt.

His characters cry and cry, impatient and serious in all their actions and behaviors. They poke fun at each other, but never their kind, never robbing the heartbreaking scenes of their weight with banter or slapstick. In an age of Marvel movies filled with sarcastically ironic characters and tongue-in-cheek Disney with their sequels and remakes, LOTR can’t lose his sincerity, or it won’t be Tolkien anymore.


The treatment of its female characters

The ever-controversial “strong female character” has once again sparked heated debate regarding Galadriel’s treatment. Loyal fans of the original books point out that although Tolkien’s female characters are few in number, they are some of the strongest in Tolkien’s world. Galadriel is strong because of her grace, her femininity, her wisdom, and her political tact, not because she can wield a sword like the best of men.

rings of power, based on its teasers, seems to say that the greatest strength worth counting is physical prowess on the battlefield. Tolkien already has a character who fits that role: Éowyn, who killed the invincible Witch-king because, in quotes, “I’m not a man.”

The Importance of Hobbits

“Even the smallest person can change the course of the future”, a quote attributed to Tolkien. Frodo is the protagonist of LOTR, not Aragorn, the long-lost king. The efforts of Aragorn, Legolas and Gimli in the heart of the battles of Middle-earth are crucial to the survival of Men, but without Frodo and Sam’s quest to destroy the Ring, there would be no Middle-earth. to save.

Related: 8 ‘Lord Of The Rings’ Characters With The Most Tragic BackstoryFrodo is immune to the ring because he doesn’t want power, where any other seemingly more capable character would fall into temptation. Gandalf and Galadriel would see their strength soured and even the benevolent Aragorn feared corruption. Say nothing about the willpower of Sam, Merry and Pippin, who bow to no one.

Tolkien is a mythology, not an allegory

Fans and scholars of Tolkien’s books know well that the author despised allegory. Although his stories were drawn in part from life experience, Tolkien didn’t want readers to take away such simple parallels as Orcs representing a particular group of real people, for example. Tolkien wanted a timeless mythology for the people of England away from the troubles of real life.

Interviews insisting that rings of power should reflect modern times, then, is in stark contrast to Tolkien’s wishes and the books’ aims. Fantasy is escapism and LOTR is, in particular, an English mythology for the English. Filling it with modern politics is a disservice to the author whose story and life’s work are loved by so many.

Next: Review of Peter Jackson’s “Lord of the Rings”: a fantastic epic without comparison

Comments are closed.