Books printing – Vstore Reading http://vstorereading.com/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 22:00:11 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://vstorereading.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.png Books printing – Vstore Reading http://vstorereading.com/ 32 32 Wabanaki Winter Market Returns With Unique Artwork – UMaine News https://vstorereading.com/wabanaki-winter-market-returns-with-unique-artwork-umaine-news/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 20:28:28 +0000 https://vstorereading.com/wabanaki-winter-market-returns-with-unique-artwork-umaine-news/ Photo by Justin Russel. The Wabanaki Winter Market, an annual celebration of art created by Wabanaki artists, will return with unique works of art for sale from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday, December 10 at the University’s Collins Center for the Arts of Maine. . This year marks the 28th anniversary of this […]]]>

The Wabanaki Winter Market, an annual celebration of art created by Wabanaki artists, will return with unique works of art for sale from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday, December 10 at the University’s Collins Center for the Arts of Maine. .

This year marks the 28th anniversary of this signature holiday event, hosted by the UMaine Hudson Museum and the Maine Indian Basketmakers Alliance (MIBA), and supported in part by the Onion Foundation. The market will feature more than 30 Passamaquoddy, Penobscot, Maliseet and Mi’kmaq artists who create brown ash and sweetgrass baskets, birch bark containers and jewelry, among other art forms. MIBA participants include new and nationally awarded basket weavers.

The Wabanaki Winter Market also includes a performance of Penobscot songs by Kelly Demmons, a brown ash hammering display by Mi’kmaq artist Eldon Hanning, a brown ash bookmark workshop for children by the Penobscot weaver Pam Cunningham and percussion by the Burnurwurbskek Singers. Additionally, there will be book signings for “Still They Remember Me” by authors Carol Dana, Penobscot Language Master, and Margo Lukens, UMaine English Teacher, and for “Night of the Living Rez” by Morgan Talty , assistant professor of English at UMaine.

“The Hudson Museum is thrilled to welcome the large-scale return of this in-person opportunity to celebrate Abenaki artists and their extraordinary art,” said Museum Director Gretchen Faulkner. “In addition to one-of-a-kind art, visitors can learn about Wabanaki history and culture through demonstrations, music, a children’s workshop, drumming and dancing, and exhibits at the Hudson Museum.”

The calendar of events is on line. To request a reasonable accommodation, contact the museum at 207.581.1904.

Also of interest to visitors to the fair, the Minsky and Merritt galleries present exhibitions of Abenaki works of art. A collection of brown ash and Wabanaki sweetgrass baskets and basket making tools from the Leo and Florence Shay Collection will be on display at the Merritt Gallery.

The Minsky Gallery features works by Indian Island School students in grades 5-8, with artists from each grade using different printmaking techniques. Fifth graders created hand-printed and colored Plexiglas engravings of shamans and healers. Sixth-graders made colorful portraits with watercolor paint after being hand-printed. Seventh-grade students made self-portraits using linoleum block prints. Eighth grade students used techniques pioneered by Andy Warhol to create self-portraits projected onto watercolor paint.

Contact: Marcus Wolf, 207.581.3721; marcus.wolf@maine.edu

]]>
The Homer Library Board will decide if LBGTQ+ books will stay https://vstorereading.com/the-homer-library-board-will-decide-if-lbgtq-books-will-stay/ Tue, 15 Nov 2022 01:52:22 +0000 https://vstorereading.com/the-homer-library-board-will-decide-if-lbgtq-books-will-stay/ Homer Spit. (KBBI file photo) An advisory board for the Homer Public Library is set to hear arguments on Tuesday about whether more than 40 books aimed at children and young people with LGBTQ+ themes should be removed or moved to the adult section of the library. Homer Public Library director Dave Berry denied a […]]]>

Homer Spit. (KBBI file photo)

An advisory board for the Homer Public Library is set to hear arguments on Tuesday about whether more than 40 books aimed at children and young people with LGBTQ+ themes should be removed or moved to the adult section of the library.

Homer Public Library director Dave Berry denied a request from Melissa Martin to move three titles, Homer News reported. A subsequent petition added over three dozen additional books to the list. Council must consider his appeal.

The appeal is the latest targeted effort to remove LGBTQ+ books or programs from libraries across the country. In the Southeast Alaskan community of Ketchikan this year, voters refused to cut the library budget after some residents complained that drag queens were leading story time for children , the Ketchikan Daily News reported. A funding dispute was settles in Mississippi.

However, a Michigan Library Lost a majority of its funding, and accounts of banned books or attempted bans have skyrocketed in the past year, the American Library Association said in April.

In Homer, the petitions call for books “promoting transgender ideology, drag queens, homosexuality, and all other books intended to indoctrinate children in LGBQT+ ideologies ‘to be removed or not available for children'” to come across these confusing ideas” in the children’s library or in the youth section.

Berry consulted with staff after receiving Martin’s initial request. He refused to move “Morris Micklewhite and the Tangerine Dress”, by Christine Baldacchino; “Julian is a Mermaid”, by Jessica Love, and “Two Grooms on a Cake: The Story of America’s First Gay Wedding”, by Rob Sanders and illustrated by Robbie Cathro.

“Historically the policy has always been to try to be as broad as possible in adding material to the collection. We do not censor the materials. We are very open to community feedback. Our general policy has been to add rather than subtract from the collection,” Berry told the newspaper.

Martin appealed to the advisory board, which will have the final say. An immediate decision was not expected.

Homer children’s book author Madeline Veldstra, who writes as Madeline A. Hawthorne, also collected signatures online and with a printed version of Martin’s petition.

She will also address the board on her proposal to remove or move the additional titles beyond the original three.

A counter-petition to support the library manager’s decision and to support the inclusion of LGBTB+ books in the children’s section is also gathering signatures.

]]>
The Big Picture: William Eggleston at Mississippi Fred McDowell’s Funeral | William Eggleston https://vstorereading.com/the-big-picture-william-eggleston-at-mississippi-fred-mcdowells-funeral-william-eggleston/ Sun, 13 Nov 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://vstorereading.com/the-big-picture-william-eggleston-at-mississippi-fred-mcdowells-funeral-william-eggleston/ William Eggleston, the old master of American color photography, took this photo at the funeral of Mississippi bluesman Fred McDowell in 1972. He had previously taken a photograph of McDowell in his coffin, his head wrapped in white satin. The pair had become friends after Eggleston knocked on McDowell’s door one day and asked if […]]]>

William Eggleston, the old master of American color photography, took this photo at the funeral of Mississippi bluesman Fred McDowell in 1972. He had previously taken a photograph of McDowell in his coffin, his head wrapped in white satin. The pair had become friends after Eggleston knocked on McDowell’s door one day and asked if he could shoot footage of him playing the guitar. Here, Eggleston was at the back of the chapel, a dapper southern white man, who grew up in a plantation home, taking pictures. The young woman’s gaze seems to reflect all this oddity – Eggleston often drew such stares from strangers – and her camera doesn’t flinch at any of it.

McDowell’s film footage has been lost. When Eggleston later described it to a reporter, he said the playing resulted in “a wandering, then surges of melody”. This description could also delineate the photographer’s methods. Eggleston, now 83, changed the landscape of the American imagination with his exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art in 1976; the companion book to this exhibition, which featured the artist’s saturated dye-transfer prints from the southern suburbs, was called Guide by William Eggleston; it has become exactly that for a generation of filmmakers and photographers in search of authentic American alienation.

This image is included in a new picture book by Eggleston, selected from 5,000 Kodachrome slides, many of them previously unseen, taken between 1970 and 1973. The Distant Lands comes with an introduction by Eggleston’s son, William Eggleston III, in which he tries to define his old man’s place in the south, as the suburbs cobbled through the story: “The subtext of what dad documented was the loss of the soul, the loss of ‘real things’, the loss of the skills to build something well,” he wrote. One way to view this image is as a memorial to that soul.

]]>
‘The People of India’ – new book traces grassroots political actors, how they shape New India https://vstorereading.com/the-people-of-india-new-book-traces-grassroots-political-actors-how-they-shape-new-india/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 07:00:07 +0000 https://vstorereading.com/the-people-of-india-new-book-traces-grassroots-political-actors-how-they-shape-new-india/ New Delhi: What’s new in the recent “The People of India” – a title used at least three times since the mid-19e Century to describe the inhabitants of the subcontinent, mainly their ethnography? The appeal of the new book lies in its subtitle “New Indian Politics in the 21st Century”. Much emphasis has been placed […]]]>

New Delhi: What’s new in the recent “The People of India” – a title used at least three times since the mid-19e Century to describe the inhabitants of the subcontinent, mainly their ethnography?

The appeal of the new book lies in its subtitle “New Indian Politics in the 21st Century”.

Much emphasis has been placed on the word “new” in this anthology of essays compiled by social scientists Ravinder Kaur and Nayanika Mathur. Published by Penguin, “The People of India” will be released on November 15 on Softcover, ThePrint’s online site for launching non-fiction books.

According to the authors, “The function of the adjective ‘new’ is to suggest a temporal condition of transition, a time when something is changing form and being. This book is about the political form of the new, or more specifically the people who are forging and inhabiting the new that is still unfolding in New India.

The book looks at people who have significantly influenced Indian politics today. It mentions and emphasizes street politics and these resistance movements, a feature that has been prominent around the world in recent times. The book further discusses how the politics of protest laid the groundwork for conflicts between the state and its people.

Against the background of these themes, the book traces the stories of various men and women who, with their unique personalities, make up the people of New India, to shape the politics of the country today. By focusing on these distinctive individuals, the book also attempts to locate what India in the 75th year of its independence has become today.

The ‘new’ in the book gives more detail to these various grassroots political actors in India, and is a ‘modest opening to a conversation’ that the authors hope can take forward in the future.

Partha Chatterjee, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology at Columbia University, says of the book, “The activist, the outsider, the devotee, the mob, the anti-political politics, the bureaucratic subservience, a docile media and ( let me add) the raj bulldozer, beneficiary citizenship – there have been many remarkable developments in Indian politics in recent years. This magnificent volume examines these developments within a deeply historical and broadly global framework of the emergence of Indian people.

Niraja Gopal Jayal, Avantha Professor at King’s India Institute, King’s College London, says the book is “an indispensable guide to the political lexicon of New India”.

She adds, “The essays in this imaginatively crafted volume offer compelling portraits of the ‘people’ at the heart of a new democratic politics – from the kisan and the bhakt to the AamAadmi and the crone.”

Curator of this anthology Ravinder Kaur is Associate Professor of Modern South Asian Studies and Director of the Center for Global South Asian Studies at the University of Copenhagen. Most of his research focuses on the processes of capitalist transformations in 21st century India, which was also covered in his other book, “Brand New Nation”.

The other editor, Nayanika Mathur, is associate professor of anthropology and director of the South Asian Studies program at the University of Oxford. His research interests focus on the climate crisis and the Himalayas.


Read also : Survival on the World’s Highest Battlefield – New Book Tells Story of Army at Siachen Glacier


]]>
Detroit’s e-voting books have isolated issues, but hard copies of voter registration list available https://vstorereading.com/detroits-e-voting-books-have-isolated-issues-but-hard-copies-of-voter-registration-list-available/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 10:43:00 +0000 https://vstorereading.com/detroits-e-voting-books-have-isolated-issues-but-hard-copies-of-voter-registration-list-available/ According to Michigan State Department spokesman Jake Rollow, there have been isolated incidents of electronic poll books in Detroit, Michigan. Rollow explained: Electronic voting books are portable computers that have a static download of the voter registration list. When voters arrive at their polling station, election officials register them in an electronic register to ensure […]]]>

According to Michigan State Department spokesman Jake Rollow, there have been isolated incidents of electronic poll books in Detroit, Michigan.

Rollow explained: Electronic voting books are portable computers that have a static download of the voter registration list. When voters arrive at their polling station, election officials register them in an electronic register to ensure that they are registered, in the correct constituency and that they have not already voted by mail. Polling stations have paper-to-paper backups to register voters.

Rollow said he’s heard “a few reports” that e-voting books in Detroit have dwindled, but “not that much.”

Detroit’s NAACP sent out a notice that some polling places were “experiencing computer problems,” but reminded voters to stay online as they can still register through a backup paper registry and vote with paper ballots.

Kristina Karamo, the GOP candidate for Michigan secretary of state, tweeted the misinformation Tuesday, saying there had been “fraud” and “crime” in Detroit because some voters who ran in their constituency were informed that they had already voted absent.

Former President Donald Trump previously echoed Karamo’s claim and said on his Truth Social account, “The mail-in voting situation in Detroit is REALLY BAD. People show up to vote only to be told “sorry, you already voted”. This is happening in large numbers, elsewhere as well. Protest, protest, protest.

But remember: Rollow from the Michigan Secretary of State’s office has already addressed this issue and said the issue has already been resolved.

Each precinct should have a paper backup of the voter registration list in case there are problems with the electronic ballot book, Rollow said. “Obviously it might take a little longer to search for someone on paper than it would on your computer, but that shouldn’t affect a voter’s ability to vote in any way.”

“There’s no reason to expect this to be, you know, more broadly or in any way, you know, connected across jurisdictions,” Rollow said, adding that the officials would look into the matter to make sure.

As of 8 a.m. local time, 2,016,147 absentee ballots had been requested in Michigan and 1,716,264 had been submitted, Rollow added.

]]>
A curator with a unique window on history https://vstorereading.com/a-curator-with-a-unique-window-on-history/ Sun, 06 Nov 2022 21:30:41 +0000 https://vstorereading.com/a-curator-with-a-unique-window-on-history/ The deliberate preservation of the old. Curatorial Librarian David Stokoe has dedicated his 40-year career to repairing and preserving a wide range of unique library materials and collections. Throughout his career, curatorial librarian David Stokoe has had an extraordinary window into history. For the past 16 years, Stokoe has worked at Syracuse University Libraries Special […]]]>

The deliberate preservation of the old. Curatorial Librarian David Stokoe has dedicated his 40-year career to repairing and preserving a wide range of unique library materials and collections.

Throughout his career, curatorial librarian David Stokoe has had an extraordinary window into history.

For the past 16 years, Stokoe has worked at Syracuse University Libraries Special Collections Research Center and his Conservation laboratory. Located on the sixth floor of the Bird Library, the recently dedicated Joan Breier Brodsky ’67, G’68 Conservation Lab is responsible for the conservation and preservation of individual items and entire collections, making repairs to bound and unbound manuscripts, printed books, works on paper, architectural drawings and much more.

Throughout his career (which began at 17 in his hometown of Newcastle upon Tyne in the UK), Stokoe has had an extraordinary window into history. This is the nature of a conservator who has worked in museums, libraries, government archives and universities. Some of the most memorable items that have passed through his hands are:

  • Records relating to King Herod’s census
  • 4,000-year-old cuneiform tablets used by shepherds to record their flocks
  • Artwork and writings from the Isle of Man internment camps during World War II (housing people considered a security risk at the time)
  • Ancient bibles and medieval manuscripts printed from the 14th century
  • An eloquently written letter by Malcolm X describing his philosophical evolution on racism

Stokoe says the toughest project was piecing together parts of the epic “Prince Valiant” comic created by Hal Foster in 1937. It’s an adventure story that continues through 4,000 comics.

“It was originally drawn on large boards with pasted-on captions, many of which have come loose or come off completely over time,” Stokoe explains. He designed a spreadsheet to keep track of all the “orphan” captions, words and letters. Much like a giant puzzle, Stokoe essentially “reconstructed” the series using printers’ proofs and placed individual sheets back into acid-free wallets to preserve them forever.

A conservator’s job includes everything from repairing torn and tattered paper to removing tape, reconstructing books, cleaning and chemically treating paper, preparing items for preservation in a cold storage in a humidity controlled environment.

Thanks to generous philanthropic support, Stokoe has had the privilege of working with the most advanced tools in special conservation laboratories, including a custom box making machine who makes acid-free archival book boxes (it used to take 20 to 30 minutes to assemble archival boxes by hand; now it takes less than five minutes).

person scanning a copy into a computer

For the past 16 years, Stokoe has worked at Syracuse University’s Library Special Collections Research Center and its Preservation Laboratory.

Recently, Syracuse University completed construction on a 15,000 square foot facility that includes cool and cold rooms to provide optimal environmental conditions for materials that are essential for teaching and research.

Stokoe is responsible for training staff in many aspects of preservation and also teaches a graduate class “Preservation of Library and Archive Collections” covering storage environments, disaster planning/response, repair books and paper, and much more. That’s why the students in her class fight against books: “They each get a hardback and a paperback. We damage books and repair them. We break joints and spines, tear pages, remove spines and damage the corners of boards. Of course, it’s all hypothetical and they don’t get any points for the damage, just for the repair,” he says. He notes that damage inflicted in seconds can take hours to repair.

He brings with him to class, lectures and workshops a wealth of experience in damage and destruction, as well as extraordinary details of the disaster recovery process.

“At one facility, we’ve had 29 water-related emergencies in just five years,” Stokoe says. “Several construction projects have contributed to water infiltration, burst and leaking pipes, basement flooding and more. We have used a freeze-drying technique to salvage many historically important medieval volumes and other materials affected by water damage. He remembers using over 2 miles of duct tape to hang up plastic drop cloths and stuffing bags with 26 pounds of dust during HVAC renovations.

Fortunately, his disastrous experiences at Syracuse University were less dramatic, but no less interesting. Books in circulation sometimes come back with mildew, stains and even insects. “We have to put everything in a bag and freeze them at minus 30 degrees for two weeks to kill the bugs,” Stokoe explains. “Then we have to vacuum and sanitize, but we are able to salvage the most material.”

Stokoe maintains detailed notes on each retention process in a database; recording every processing detail is an essential part of a conservator’s job.

“I keep specific records so someone in the future can look into what I’ve done,” he says. “And almost everything I do is reversible. It all involves a bit of physics, math, chemistry, biology, environmental science, mechanics, and a lot of attention to quality control.

Stokoe says the job takes a lot of patience and attention to detail as it can take months to preserve some damaged materials, but he never gets discouraged.

“The repair is not the straw that breaks the camel’s back,” he explains. “Items that cannot be processed to make them accessible can still be stored in their current state in the hope that future technology will find a way. If it’s beyond my ability to fix today, I hopefully there will be a solution in the future. This means that nothing is ever really eliminated due to its current state.

]]>
Maple Mustard Roast Chicken is a Family Dinner with Big Flavors https://vstorereading.com/maple-mustard-roast-chicken-is-a-family-dinner-with-big-flavors/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 13:28:19 +0000 https://vstorereading.com/maple-mustard-roast-chicken-is-a-family-dinner-with-big-flavors/ Maple Mustard Roast Chicken Active time:15 minutes Total time:1 hour Servings:4 Active time:15 minutes Total time:1 hour Servings:4 Comment this story Comment This recipe comes from eat voraciously newsletter. register here to get a weeknight dinner recipe, tips for substitutions, techniques and more delivered to your inbox Monday-Thursday. The days are getting shorter, the air […]]]>

Maple Mustard Roast Chicken

Active time:15 minutes

Total time:1 hour

Servings:4

Active time:15 minutes

Total time:1 hour

Servings:4

Comment

This recipe comes from eat voraciously newsletter. register here to get a weeknight dinner recipe, tips for substitutions, techniques and more delivered to your inbox Monday-Thursday.

The days are getting shorter, the air is crisp, and there are about as many leaves on the ground as on the trees. As soon as the temperature drops below 50 degrees, I find myself wanting to turn up the oven. It’s the season for braises and roasts.

This maple and mustard roast chicken recipe is inspired by the one in British author Diana Henry’s cookbook “Simple: Effortless Food, Big Flavors.” I love how thoughtful she was about this collection of recipes. The idea was to build on the theme of her 2004 book, “Pure Simple Cooking,” which she wrote shortly after having her first child.

“He was constantly crying,” Henry wrote in the intro, “so I always wore him and didn’t have my hands free. The more elaborate cuisine I had enjoyed before he arrived went out the window. In fact , I ate take-out pizza for several weeks after he was born, often through tears as I wondered if I would ever be able to cook again.

It’s a feeling that all my friends with young children have expressed to me. I try to feature simple recipes in this newsletter, but only working parents know what a really simple recipe looks like. “I started making dishes that were just stuck in the oven,” Henry continues. “I didn’t mind that they took a long time to cook, only if they took a long time to prepare. … It meant a lot to me that people quote ‘Cook Simple’ [her 2010 book] like a cookbook that really helped them. It’s not because it’s a fast food book, but a low effort food book.

That’s the ticket: foods that don’t require too much handling time, yet deliver satisfying flavors.

Here you will make a mixture of butter, maple syrup and mustard. It is brushed lightly over the bird before entering the oven, then brushed deeply just before the bird exits. We end up with a browned chicken, tender and almost sticky thanks to this sweet and salty sauce.

For Henry’s recipe, the poultry is roasted with fresh figs. Where I live fresh figs are hard to come by so I tried this with a robust combination of onions and carrots. They roast under the chicken, capturing its juices, for a one-pan meal that only takes 15 minutes to prepare and 45 minutes to cook.

The only tricky part of this recipe is mash the chicken. If you’ve never done this before, I’ll walk you through the general method (it’s also described in detail below). I like to use kitchen shears to cut out the spine. Then I turn the bird over and press down on its sternum, allowing it to lay flat. This helps it cook much faster. If you are pressed for time, ask your supermarket butcher to do this part for you.

Henry recommends serving it with a grain such as brown rice, bulgur, or cooked freekeh with finely grated orange zest.

Maple Mustard Roasted Chicken

  • No maple syrup? >> Use honey or brown sugar instead.
  • Want to skip the butter? >> Olive oil works well.
  • Don’t like chicken? >> Try this with a pork loin, which will take much less time to cook.
  • If you don’t eat meat >> I would brush this marinade on portobello mushroom caps. Roast the carrots and onions until barely tender before adding the mushroom caps to the pan.

Do you want to save this recipe? Click the bookmark icon under the serving size at the top of this page, then navigate to Stories saved in My Message.

Evolve this recipe and get a printable desktop version here.

  • 1 bunch baby carrots (1 pound total), trimmed, washed and very coarsely chopped
  • 2 small yellow onions (10 ounces total), cut into eighths
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
  • 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
  • 2 tablespoons of maple syrup
  • 1 tbsp finely chopped fresh thyme or rosemary leaves
  • A whole chicken (3 1/2 to 4 pounds)
  • 1 teaspoon fine salt, more if needed
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly cracked black pepper, plus more if needed

Place a rack in the middle of the oven and preheat to 425 degrees.

Spread the onions and carrots on a large rimmed baking sheet. Drizzle with oil and toss until lightly coated.

In a small bowl, use a pastry brush to combine the melted butter, mustard, maple syrup and chopped thyme or rosemary.

Spatchcock the Chicken: Place the chicken, breast side down, on a cutting board. Remove giblets, if included. Using sharp kitchen shears, cut along both sides of the backbone of the chicken to remove it. Turn the bird’s chest up and use the heels of your hands to press down on the sternum, flattening it slightly. Trim excess fat, if desired. Pat it dry and season it on all sides and in all crevices with salt and pepper. Place it over the vegetables on the baking sheet, breast side up. Lightly brush the chicken with the maple-mustard mixture and slide it into the hot oven, legs facing the bottom of the oven.

Roast the chicken for 30 minutes or until starting to brown. Using tongs, toss the vegetables so they brown evenly. Baste the chicken generously with the maple-mustard mixture, then roast for 5 minutes. Drizzle with the remaining maple-mustard mixture, then roast for another 5 to 10 minutes, or until a thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the thigh registers 165 degrees and the juices run clear. Let the chicken rest for 5 to 10 minutes before carving it. (To avoid contaminating your cooked poultry, do not apply the maple-mustard mixture once your poultry is well cooked.) Serve with onions and carrots on the side.

Per serving (2 pieces of chicken, 1 cup of vegetables)

Calories: 530; Total fat: 20 g; Saturated fat: 6g; Cholesterol: 219mg; Sodium: 981mg; Carbohydrates: 26g; Dietary fiber: 5g; Sugar: 14g; Protein: 64g.

This analysis is an estimate based on the available ingredients and this preparation. It should not replace the advice of a dietitian or nutritionist.

Adapted from “Simple” by Diana Henry (Mitchell Beazley, 2016).

Tested by G. Daniela Galarza; questions by e-mail to voraciously@washpost.com.

Evolve this recipe and get a printable desktop version here.

Browse our recipe finder for over 9,900 post-tested recipes.

Did you make this recipe? Take a picture and tag us on Instagram with #eatingvoraciously.

Check out this week’s Eat Voraciously recipes:

Monday: Green lentil soup with noodles and mint

Tuesday: Eggs in a hole with curly lettuce

Wednesday: Kabocha Squash and Peanut Stew

More recipes from Eating voraciously

]]>
AASL Congratulates All Ready Access/Schlow to School Program https://vstorereading.com/aasl-congratulates-all-ready-access-schlow-to-school-program/ Mon, 31 Oct 2022 21:02:20 +0000 https://vstorereading.com/aasl-congratulates-all-ready-access-schlow-to-school-program/ CHICAGO — Following a resolution submitted by the Pennsylvania School Librarians Association (PSLA), the American Association of School Librarians (AASL) has officially commended the All Ready Access/Schlow to School program. The program is one of eleven outstanding programs, events, and products nominated by AASL chapters for their support of the school librarianship profession and the […]]]>

CHICAGO — Following a resolution submitted by the Pennsylvania School Librarians Association (PSLA), the American Association of School Librarians (AASL) has officially commended the All Ready Access/Schlow to School program. The program is one of eleven outstanding programs, events, and products nominated by AASL chapters for their support of the school librarianship profession and the learners the profession serves. To be considered, programs must align with the principles expressed in the national association’s mission and values ​​statements. The full list is available at www.ala.org/aasl/commendations.

“As part of this program, all students in the State College Area School District automatically receive a Schlow/Central County Public Library Card,” said Laura Ward, outgoing president of the PSLA. “What makes it unique is that students and school staff can reserve print materials at the public library and have their reservations sent to their school building. Thanks to the work of Schlow Public Library staff who process book requests and prepare them for pickup, and State College Area School District staff who pick up and drop off requests to ensure books arrive between hands of students and staff – access is provided without barriers.

“This collaboration between the public library and the school district aligns with the AASL’s shared belief that information resources should be equitably available,” said AASL President Kathy Lester. “Congratulations to the Schlow Center Area Library and the State College Area School District (SCASD) for their partnership in ensuring public library resources are available to the entire school community.”

“The PSLA is proud that the Schlow to School program is recognized by the AASL,” said Ward. “It’s truly an incredible collaboration between the school and public library programs where the students and staff of the State College Area School District are the winners.”

The AASL Chapters to provide a channel of communication between AASL-affiliated school library organizations and the AASL Board of Directors. An AASL Chapter nominates outstanding programs, events, and products for official AASL endorsements, which are then reviewed and approved by the AASL Board of Directors for national recognition.

The American Association of School Librarians, www.aasl.orga division of the American Library Association (ALA), empowers leaders to transform teaching and learning.

]]>
Protesters rally in DC for those incarcerated for marijuana convictions https://vstorereading.com/protesters-rally-in-dc-for-those-incarcerated-for-marijuana-convictions/ Mon, 24 Oct 2022 21:39:25 +0000 https://vstorereading.com/protesters-rally-in-dc-for-those-incarcerated-for-marijuana-convictions/ Comment this story Comment Wearing a 50ft inflatable joint with the words “quit Biden our time” printed on the side and threading green pot leaves on hats, flags and suits, protesters gathered outside the White House on Monday morning, demanding that President Biden is using his executive authority to release those incarcerated for nonviolent marijuana-related […]]]>

Comment

Wearing a 50ft inflatable joint with the words “quit Biden our time” printed on the side and threading green pot leaves on hats, flags and suits, protesters gathered outside the White House on Monday morning, demanding that President Biden is using his executive authority to release those incarcerated for nonviolent marijuana-related convictions.

His announcement earlier this month that he would grant massive pardons to anyone convicted of a federal crime for simple possession of marijuana did not go far enough for protesters, who point to the recognition of House officials Blanche that pardons will not lead to the release of anyone. from prison.

“It was a missed opportunity to bring about real change. The president could have done so much more than he did,” said Steve DeAngelo, founder of the Last Prisoner Project, a nonprofit working on cannabis-related criminal justice reform that has lobbied the White House on this issue, during the demonstration. “He really only did the bare minimum he could do to generate a positive-sounding press release.”

Outside the White House, protesters blasted audio from a clip of Biden during a 2020 debate with Cory Booker saying “everyone, anyone with a record should be released from jail, their folders deleted”.

“Keep your promise, Joe, let our people go,” chanted the crowd.

The White House has insisted that the pardons fulfill a 2020 campaign promise and would apply to about 6,500 people nationwide who have federal convictions for simple possession of marijuana on their record since 1992. is incarcerated in federal prison for simple possession alone, officials said.

The Last Prisoner Project estimates that there are approximately 2,800 people in federal prison for marijuana-related convictions, a statistic the organization says stems from a 2021 report from Recidiviz, a non-profit organization that uses technology and data to create tools for criminal justice reform.

Adam Eidinger, a longtime cannabis activist and co-founder of DC Marijuana Justice, who has worked to legalize drugs in the city, said part of organizers’ demands include the immediate release of 100 prisoners and the 2 800 by Christmas.

After Virginia legalizes pot, majority of defendants are still black

“The greatest civil rights tragedy of the modern era is putting people behind bars for cannabis,” Eidinger said. “If we get any interest from the White House and they are willing to arrange meetings with representatives of these protests, then I imagine we will call off civil disobedience and declare victory.”

Just after 11 a.m., protesters filled the inflatable joint and carried it down Pennsylvania Avenue to an entrance to Eisenhower’s executive office building.

Smoke billowed in the air as a handful of people lit joints on the sidewalk and loudspeakers – including hip-hop artists Redman and Dead Prez’s M-1 – swirled past a microphone.

In response to a request for comment, a White House spokesperson pointed to Biden’s past commitments, including on his website in 2020, which included Biden’s belief that “no one should be imprisoned for using illegal drugs only”.

Although public perception around marijuana has changed significantly, organizers are concerned about people who were convicted and sentenced before this more widespread acceptance. Marijuana is now legal for adult recreational use in the District, two territories and 19 states. He’s on the ballot in five more states next month.

Organizers say the country must consider how harmful policies during the war on drugs have disproportionately affected black and brown communities, through discriminatory policing practices and marijuana sentencing laws. White entrepreneurs make up the majority of the legal market as black people continue to account for the bulk of marijuana-related arrests nationwide.

Raiden Washington, vice chairman of the board of directors of Students for Sensible Drug Policy, said they traveled from Georgia for the protest.

“We want everyone who is still behind bars out of jail right now,” Washington, 26, said. “We want to keep him on his promise.”

One such person is Richardo Ashmeade, who pleaded guilty in November 2008 to conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute marijuana. He was sentenced to almost 22 years. He is being held in a medium-security federal prison in Welch, W.Va., with a expected release date of April 2, 2027.

While incarcerated, he keeps in touch with his four children and defers to a saying from Jamaica, where he is from: “You don’t know your strengths until you have no choice but to be strong.

He gives relationship advice to his daughters and tries to be present in their lives – whatever they are going through. A girl is in law school, so he studied law while also fighting for her case. Another girl is studying nursing, so he ordered some books on the subject so he could talk with her about his interests.

Ashmeade asked to be released from prison during the coronavirus pandemic, but was refused. In court filings filed by the government in opposition to his request for compassionate release, prosecutors said Ashmeade was integral to a drug offense that spanned more than seven years and included between 3,000 kilograms and 10,000 kilograms of marijuana, the seizure of over $2 million in cash, multiple foreign bank accounts and properties, and the use of a firearm by a co-accused.

But in Ashmeade’s more than 14 years incarceration, he has followed media coverage of a “thriving cannabis industry that we actually helped create. There are big companies on the stock exchange… making so much money, more than we ever dreamed of.

“It feels like a slap in the face, to tell you the truth, for Biden to forgive just for a mere possession just before the midterm elections just to get some clout. It’s very disheartening and actually a disappointment,” Ashmeade said. “We feel here that he really forgot about us, the guys who received draconian sentences.”

By early afternoon, the crowd had dwindled to a handful of organizers and activists seated in the middle of 17th Street NW, some of whom said they planned to stay until arrested.

“It matters to me personally because I smoke weed. I know a lot of people who smoke weed,” said Evan Hazlett, 23, board member of Student for Sensible Drug Policy. We are the people who need to step up and take responsibility for the plant we are consuming and not leave behind the people who are in jail for the same thing we are doing.”

The group returned to Pennsylvania Avenue where they blocked a White House staff entrance. Just before 3 p.m., a protester walked through a half-open front door as it closed and was immediately arrested.

“The individual was unable to pass through the security gate. Charges for unauthorized entry are pending,” said Lt. Paul Mayhair, spokesman for the United States Secret Service Uniformed Division in a statement sent by email.

]]>
5 questions to Nick Bostrom https://vstorereading.com/5-questions-to-nick-bostrom/ Fri, 21 Oct 2022 20:00:00 +0000 https://vstorereading.com/5-questions-to-nick-bostrom/ With help from Derek Robertson Nick Bostrom. | Wikimedia Commons Welcome back to our regular Friday feature, The future in five questions. Today we have Nick Bostrom, the author of “Superintelligence— the New York Times bestseller that united Elon Musk and Bill Gates over concerns about the existential risks of AI. His current research focuses, […]]]>

With help from Derek Robertson

Welcome back to our regular Friday feature, The future in five questions. Today we have Nick Bostrom, the author of “Superintelligence— the New York Times bestseller that united Elon Musk and Bill Gates over concerns about the existential risks of AI. His current research focuses, among other things, on the question of whether AI should have rights. Responses have been edited for length and clarity.

What is an underrated great idea?

The moral status of future digital minds. The idea is that as AI systems become more sophisticated and match smaller mammals in their abilities – and even more so as they approach human abilities – they might begin to claim a status. corresponding morale. This question is very much on the fringes of the debate, even if it is roughly now where AI security was in the period 2012-2014.

It would be premature for legislation to enter into this area. There are still so many fundamental unknowns here. We do not understand exactly what would be the criteria for which a digital mind is conscious or when it has other properties that could give it moral status.

What is one technology that you think is overrated?

A few years ago, I thought 3D printing was overrated. Like, oh, in the future everyone will have a 3D printer at home! It always seemed implausible to me that you would want to print your little plastic utensils and replace your china with that. Even if you could print this coffee mug, what was the limiting factor in getting your hands on a consumer coffee mug in the first place?

Which book shaped your conception of the future the most?

K. Eric Drexler”Creation Engineswhere he laid out his vision for the future of nanotechnology in 1986. Then there was a book by a philosopher, John Leslie, “The end of the worldwhich was an early example of trying to think about the risks to our future. And also a book by Hans Moravec, “Think of the childrenwas one of the first discussions about the future of AI.

What could the government be doing about technology that it is not doing?

Legislators and regulators should be more aware of the rapid advances in synthetic biology.

The culture in the field of nuclear physics was very different after Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Nuclear physicists realized that what they were doing was not just creative science, but that they had a certain responsibility and need for secrecy when their work could be used to make nuclear weapons technology.

This same understanding is not widespread in the world of biotechnology. The focus is still on democratizing access, open publication and making tools available, but it’s as dangerous a field as nuclear physics – more so, in fact, because even if you knew exactly all the designs and all the tools and all the tricks needed to make nuclear weapons, you still couldn’t make one because you would need raw materials that were very hard to get, whereas in biology you wouldn’t You’re not really limited to difficult ingredients – so all you need is knowledge.

What surprised you the most this year?

Failure to fund the pandemic preparedness bill – in particular the inability to finance it entirely the first time. I had thought, given COVID, it would be one of the few things that would have bipartisan support. I would have thought that a lot of political interests would have been served by pushing for this.

POLITICO’s Morning Money had a report this morning over a proposal for the Commodity Futures Trading Commission to regulate crypto – and the infighting it sparked in the industry.

Blockchain Association executive director Kristin Smith told MM’s Sam Sutton and Kate Davidson that the legislative proposal “doesn’t seem fully ready for prime time yet,” reflecting controversy that has erupted over a few key changes. potential in a draft published by crypto attorney Gabriel Shapiro.

One objection was quite predictable: some of these changes would involve the SEC more closely in crypto regulation, which is anathema to the industry. However, the other objection came from unlikely quarters: the progressive Center for American Progress, which had endorsed the bill in an effort to persuade Democrats to back a measure that could at least provide some modicum of regulation and protection. consumers for industry.

Get the whole storyincluding a threat from CAP’s Todd Phillips that he could still “change [his] position on the bill and work to defeat it,” at Morning Money. — Derek Robertson

As AI takes over the world of technology, What do investors with skin in the game think of the dizzying list of developments over the past year and their potential policy implications?

The concise title “2022 State of AI Reportfrom AI investors Nathan Benaich and Ian Hogarth, gives a little insight. The document is packed with analysis of what’s happening at the forefront of research and within the tech industry, but the “politics” section of the report contains particularly relevant information, including:

  • Academia has almost entirely fallen behind industry in research, with implications for “AI security, pursuit of diverse ideas, concentration of talent, etc. »
  • AI Wins Big Investments in Defense Industry, Including Anduril’s $7 Billion Dept of Defense Contract
  • China cut off from NVIDIA and AMD chips could spark its own AI R&D

The report also touches on security, noting that the UK and EU are much more proactive on the subject, even as researchers around the world are increasingly worried. — Derek Robertson

  • Take a look at some of the ways AI is is already transforming craft of artists.
  • Microsoft gives a major boost to its investment in OpenAI.
  • Some Chinese manufacturers are already skirting the Biden administration’s chip bans.
  • A Bloody New Era drone war rises in Ukraine.
  • Web3 Investor Thinks Meta Needs To Pump Even more money in the metaverse.

Stay in touch with the whole team: Ben Schrecker ([email protected]); Derek Robertson ([email protected]); Steve Heuser ([email protected]); and Benton Ives ([email protected]). Follow us @DigitalFuture on Twitter.

If you have received this newsletter, you can Register and read our mission statement to the links provided.

]]>