Books genre – Vstore Reading http://vstorereading.com/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 18:20:08 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://vstorereading.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.png Books genre – Vstore Reading http://vstorereading.com/ 32 32 The Best Lesser-Known Fantasy Books to Read During the Holidays https://vstorereading.com/the-best-lesser-known-fantasy-books-to-read-during-the-holidays/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 17:45:00 +0000 https://vstorereading.com/the-best-lesser-known-fantasy-books-to-read-during-the-holidays/ Many players are also lovers of literature, and more specifically of the fantasy genre. And what better way to get away from the screen than to read a book curled up on the sofa, with the holidays out of breath and all the fictional worlds to discover? RELATED: The Best TV Shows Based on Comics […]]]>

Many players are also lovers of literature, and more specifically of the fantasy genre. And what better way to get away from the screen than to read a book curled up on the sofa, with the holidays out of breath and all the fictional worlds to discover?


RELATED: The Best TV Shows Based on Comics

Whether new or old, fantasy novels have the unique ability to offer escape while offering an inside look at people’s values ​​and desires and working – quite simply – to make us all better humans.

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9/9 The King of Elfland’s Daughter by Lord Dunsany

King_of_elflands_daughter

Fantasy lovers unfamiliar with this book should pick it up right away and then pick up a few more for their friends, as they would make great holiday gifts.

The “why” this book is great is a difficult question to answer: the story is one that more or less all fantasy readers know. A prince goes on an adventure to find his princess. Only his princess comes from another world called Elfland, and the problems start after they get married.

Written in a language that reads like a spell and an old forgotten fairy tale, The King of Elfland’s Daughter allows readers to visit a universe that does not always make sense, but which creates strong emotions.

First published in 1924 by GP Putnam’s Sons

8/9 Lud-In-The-Mist by Hope Mirrlees

Lud-In-The-Mist by Hope Mirrlees New Book Cover

This author may have written only three books, with Lud-in-the-mist being the third, but she is a shining example of quality VS quantity.

Lud-in-the-mist is the fictional town where the novel takes place, and it is located at the junction of two rivers, one of them leading to Fairyland. In this world, eating fairy fruit is frowned upon, and no one is more inclined to punish those who do so than Chanticleer, the mayor. When his son is suspected of having eaten a fairy fruit, Chanticleer must change his way of acting and thinking if he wants to have any chance of saving his kingdom and his heir.

Players know very well how it’s nice to explore fictional placesand readers of this novel will find themselves exploring more than expected – and they will love it.

First published in 1926 by William Collins, Sons

7/9 Midnight Folk by John Masefield

Book cover of The Midnight Folk by John Masefield

It could be considered a children’s book, but the fantastic world and the extravagant characters of Midnight Folk are more than enough to whet the appetite of adults looking to be captivated by mysterious worlds and creatures.

It belongs to the list of books to be adapted in seriesand one day, hopefully sooner rather than later, fans will have the chance to not only read about the adventures of Kay Harker, but watch them as well.

Kay searches for treasure that was stolen from her great-grandfather, but he’s not the only one. A clan of witches, as well as its governess who is also a witch, are looking for the same treasure. The good thing is that Kay is not alone – he goes on many adventures, with talking animals, strange creatures and his toys.

First published in 1927 by Heinemann

6/9 An Earthsea Magician by Ursula K. Le Guin

A Wizard of Earthsea by Ursula K. Le Guin Antique book cover

Viewers who watched Tales from Earthsea and didn’t like the chance to change their minds about the story. The adaptation may have failed and even annoyed the author, but the book itself is a wonderful example of quality fantasy literature.

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Epervier, the main hero, discovers that he has magical powers that go beyond his village’s understanding. A mage takes him on as a student, and together they embark on many adventures, one of which is finding his real name.

First published in 1968 by Parnassus Press

5/9 Little, Big: Or, The Fairy Parliament by John Crowley

Little Big Gold, The Fairy Parliament By John Crowley

With Small bigthe reader will be transported to Edgewood, which is a house, but not exactly a house, since it is several houses altogether, a place, but not exactly a place, since it does not exist on any map.

Edgewood is where Daily Alice Drinkwater lives with her family, a ‘sampler’ house her great-grandfather built for potential clients to view and hire as an architect. In reality, however, the house protects the family with its confusing design and is a place that leads directly to Fairie.

Smoky Barnable, in love with Alice, goes in search of her and marries her. And it’s the beginning of an epic story that spans many generations, many worlds and many stories.

First published in 1981 by Bantam Books

4/9 Moon Heart By Charles De Lint

Moon Heart-1

Another home, another portal to a different world, another love. What’s different in moon heart? All. Charles De Lint, with this formidable urban fantasy novel, manages to take the reader both to places that are well known to him and to places that do not exist with the same ease and conviction.

It all started in the 80s in an Ottawa antique store when a girl who is determined to know more about everything finds a ring that can afford it to her.

First published in 1984 by Ace Books

3/9 The City of Beasts by Isabel Allende

Book cover of The City of Beasts by Isabel Allende

The type of viewer who loves alternative kids movies like Stardust, Pan’s Labyrinthand Taken away as if by magic will have a very pleasant surprise by opening the first volume of this astonishing trilogy by the ethereal Isabel Allende.

RELATED: Books to read if you like fantasy RPGs

She may be known for her books on magical realism, but in this trilogy she manages to write a perfectly “normal” young adult fantasy book, only… it’s not so normal. It’s an adventure that takes place in the Amazon rainforest, with a boy whose family is in crisis, a super cool grandmother, many interesting friends… and beasts.

First published in 2002 by Sudamericana

2/9 Sun by Robin McKinley

sunshine

It’s almost unbelievable that this stunning vampire fantasy novel hasn’t been picked up for a show yet. With so many incredible series based on books, one has to wonder “where are the producers looking?”

Sunshine takes place in a world that is very similar to our own; only it contains the Others, who are the ones with the biggest fan base in our world: werewolves, vampires and demons.

Sunshine, the heroine of this book, gets caught by vampires and is trapped in a room with one of them, who is chained to the wall. An unusual relationship develops between them and no, it’s not because he is very handsome.

First published in 2003 by Berkley Publishing Group

1/9 Half Sick of Shadows by Laura Sebastian

Half Sick Of Shadows book cover by Laura Sebastian

Readers love it, and listeners love it even more, thanks to the excellent audiobook adaptation of the book.

In both cases, Half sick of the shadows is a story that stays with the reader long after it’s over. King Arthur, Guinevere, Lancelot and Morgana. Yes, it’s a myth everyone knows, but this time it’s told from the perspective of Elaine, the Lady of the Shallots – and she has a lot to tell.

First published in 2021 by Ace Books

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The Bookseller – Rights – Hodderscape beats Tor Summers publisher’s first adult fantasy https://vstorereading.com/the-bookseller-rights-hodderscape-beats-tor-summers-publishers-first-adult-fantasy/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 09:18:06 +0000 https://vstorereading.com/the-bookseller-rights-hodderscape-beats-tor-summers-publishers-first-adult-fantasy/ Hodderscape has acquired two novels by first author Georgia Summers, editor of Pan Macmillan’s speculative fiction publisher Tor, in a “meaningful” preemption. Molly Powell, Editorial Director, has acquired worldwide rights to The city of stardust and a second novel by Robbie Guillory at Underline Literary Agency. The first book will be published in hardcover in […]]]>

Hodderscape has acquired two novels by first author Georgia Summers, editor of Pan Macmillan’s speculative fiction publisher Tor, in a “meaningful” preemption.

Molly Powell, Editorial Director, has acquired worldwide rights to The city of stardust and a second novel by Robbie Guillory at Underline Literary Agency. The first book will be published in hardcover in January 2024.

Nivia Evans, editor-in-chief at Orbit US, bought the American rights to two books, while Bragellone bought the French rights. Spanish rights were pre-empted by Urano, German rights by Heyne and Italian rights by HarperCollins Italia.

The city of stardust is an autonomous adult fantasy. It tells the story of the Everly family, who for generations have been cursed to lose their brightest and best, taken by a woman named Penelope, who never gets old, never gets sick, and never forgives a debt.

The synopsis continues: “When her mother disappears in the middle of the night, the curse falls on Violet Everly, unless she can break it first. To do so, she must descend into an alluring and magical underworld of power-hungry scholars, fickle gods and monsters bent on revenge, and travel to the ends of the earth to find the city of Stardust, where Everly’s story began.

Powell said: “I knew in one sentence that I would fall in love with The city of stardust. I was swept up in a story I kept thinking about: heartwarming, touching, and steeped in magic. Georgia has created a truly breathtaking world of dark scholars, terrible curses, broken promises, doors to whole new worlds, and love as both life force and destruction.

“I’m so excited to see this major new talent making waves in the genre, and for other readers to have the opportunity to get lost in this book.”

Guillory said: “When I read the first few pages of what was to become The city of stardust, I knew Georgia was working on something really special, and the rest of the book didn’t disappoint. At Hodderscape it is in the best and most enthusiastic hands, and I can’t wait for this book to be released to the world.

Summers commented, “I’m thrilled to be working with Molly Powell and the Hodderscape team! I wrote The city of stardust during the long periods of confinement, when I wanted to be pretty much anywhere else, and it’s a bit of a love letter to this magical desire for adventure. Molly and Robbie, my agent, championed it, and I hope readers enjoy Violet Everly’s story as much as I did writing it.

Earlier this week it was announcement that the adult and YA sci-fi and fantasy roster of Hodder & Stoughton and the Hodderscape community would become an imprint in March 2023.

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Author Debbie Macomber and the Holiday Romance Genre https://vstorereading.com/author-debbie-macomber-and-the-holiday-romance-genre/ Mon, 14 Nov 2022 20:50:27 +0000 https://vstorereading.com/author-debbie-macomber-and-the-holiday-romance-genre/ Readers can relate to the daily challenges its characters face, according to Shauna Summers, editor-in-chief of Macomber. “She captures family, relationships, home, and community in a way that’s universally relatable,” says Summers. “It’s a theme you see in fan letters: ‘I went through a terrible divorce’ or ‘I lost my husband’ or whatever.” See more […]]]>

Readers can relate to the daily challenges its characters face, according to Shauna Summers, editor-in-chief of Macomber. “She captures family, relationships, home, and community in a way that’s universally relatable,” says Summers. “It’s a theme you see in fan letters: ‘I went through a terrible divorce’ or ‘I lost my husband’ or whatever.”

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A dream come true

Macomber grew up in Yakima, Washington, dreaming of becoming a writer, but “that dream was so fragile,” she says. She struggled to keep up with her classes, which were made difficult due to her dyslexia, and recalls a humbling moment in high school: “Each of us, before graduating, was asked: ‘ What are you going to do with your life?’ It was the first time I had said out loud, “I’m going to write books. I’ll never forget the sadness that took hold of my principal’s face. She didn’t say the words, but what she said.” ‘ she implied was, ‘You need to think about doing something about your intelligence, Debbie.

Macomber married at 19 and soon had a houseful of children. Years later, in her thirties, she began to write seriously, publishing her first novel, Stars light, in 1983. His next goal was to make it to the bestseller list. To that end, she lingered in bookstores, perusing the books intently, trying to figure out what made them such compelling reads. Needless to say, she cracked the code.

“Debbie is so humble, and it’s easy to think her success came from being in the right place at the right time,” says Adele LaCombe, Macomber’s daughter and CEO of Debbie Macomber Inc. “Yet the to know and be with her is to witness her discipline, her tenacity, her determination and how she continually improves her skills over time.…During COVID, she wrote from home during the first half the day, then spent every afternoon taking MasterClasses [online classes] to have fun. Not just a few, she’s taken over 100 MasterClasses, and you can expect that knowledge to help inform her fiction.

Despite its runaway success, Macomber has managed to retain its small-town sensibility. A devout Christian with 13 grandchildren, she relaxes by digging clams along the coast and tending to her garden. She says she plans to slow down her writing pace a bit — it can be grueling to meet her strict publishing deadlines — and sometimes wonders about her legacy.

She has a wall in her home covered with a collection of framed autographs from some of her favorite authors – writers who have stood the test of time, like Helen Keller, Harriet Beecher Stowe, George Bernard Shaw and Harper Lee. “Every time I walk up those stairs,” Macomber says, “I’m reminded of the power of story and my responsibility as a writer to create stories that will linger.”

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Book Review: CREATURES OF THE DESERT https://vstorereading.com/book-review-creatures-of-the-desert/ Sat, 12 Nov 2022 20:47:15 +0000 https://vstorereading.com/book-review-creatures-of-the-desert/ Thank you, Erewhon Books, for sending me a copy of Desert Creatures in exchange for an honest review! At nine years old, Magdala and her father find themselves exiled from their home and seeking refuge in the Sonoran Desert. There they join other survivors on a pilgrimage to the holy city of Las Vegas. Magdala, […]]]>

Thank you, Erewhon Books, for sending me a copy of Desert Creatures in exchange for an honest review!

At nine years old, Magdala and her father find themselves exiled from their home and seeking refuge in the Sonoran Desert. There they join other survivors on a pilgrimage to the holy city of Las Vegas. Magdala, born with a clubfoot, hopes the holy vigilantes can heal her. But as the pilgrims quickly succumb to the horrors of the desert, Magdala ends up finding herself alone.

After seven years of surviving on her own, Magdala takes matters into her own hands. She kidnaps an exiled priest at gunpoint and heads for Vegas again. The two must learn to trust each other to survive the monstrous wasteland and achieve their salvation.

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I don’t think it’s possible to overstate how much I enjoyed this book. desert creatureThat ticks all the boxes on my incredibly niche list of things I look for in a book. It’s a post-apocalyptic, far-west version of Jeff VanderMeerit is Annihilation combined with The real courage and The roadand it is absolutely beautiful.

Kay Chronoster takes a break desert creatures in three parts: Outlaws, Exiles and Ghosts. It’s basically three novels stitched together by Magdala’s story. Each section represents a crucial point in its development; Magdala goes from innocent child to wayward youth to criminal and hero, depending on who you ask.

Magdala reminds me a bit of Laura from Octavia Butlerit is parable of the sower. Although she is young, she is smart, determined and tough. Despite all the horror she faces, she adapts and fights her way through. Her journey from a child to a capable and powerful woman is incredible.

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This book is dark, and it’s not for the faint-hearted. Very few people in this world are kind, and many commit horrible acts to survive. Even those who try to do good suffer. Spend too much time in the desert and you could develop desert sickness. People slowly go mad, wandering until they die or merge with animal remains to roam the desert in misery. Despite the truly terrible things that happen, Chronister’s prose is poetic, and the uncanny becomes almost beautiful.

desert creatures takes a unique take on ecological horror. Unlike many other books of its kind, it does not look at the direct results of the climate crisis like global warming, pandemics, or rising sea levels. Instead, Chronister uses surreal elements to illustrate humanity’s response to a hostile planet.

I loved Chronoster’s decision to make Las Vegas a center of salvation in the desert wasteland. Although it holds religious relics and is home to living saints, Vegas is more focused on extracting what it can from desperate pilgrims while shutting down any so-called heretics the Church sees as a threat. Stopwatch uses desert creatures to explore hypocrisy, corruption, and religious control and critique America’s fusion of Christianity and right-wing capitalism.

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If you are looking for a post-apocalyptic and dystopian western, desert creatures is a perfect read. Check it out if you’re a fan of Annihilation or even The last of usand keep an eye on Kay Chronister for more!

desert creatures is out now and available for purchase from your local independent bookstore or Librairie.org.

TW: ableism, amputation, body horror, religious abuse/spiritual manipulation, death of child, death of parent, gun violence, implied sexual assault, murder, pregnancy, violence and gore

Sci-fi westerns will be obsessed with while WYNONNA EARP is on hiatus

Alex Faccibene
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The smartest person in the Marvel Universe, how ‘Black Panther’ – and its sequel – changed Hollywood, and why pop culture representation matters – Reuters https://vstorereading.com/the-smartest-person-in-the-marvel-universe-how-black-panther-and-its-sequel-changed-hollywood-and-why-pop-culture-representation-matters-reuters/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 19:39:01 +0000 https://vstorereading.com/the-smartest-person-in-the-marvel-universe-how-black-panther-and-its-sequel-changed-hollywood-and-why-pop-culture-representation-matters-reuters/ By Marie-Kate Brogan Who is the smartest person in the Marvel Universe? You can think of Iron Man Tony Stark or – with “Black Panther: Wakanda Forever” out this week – possibly Princess Shuri, Scientific Director of Wakanda. But Grace D. GipsonPh.D., a pop culture scholar and future black feminist who studies representation around race […]]]>

Who is the smartest person in the Marvel Universe? You can think of Iron Man Tony Stark or – with “Black Panther: Wakanda Forever” out this week – possibly Princess Shuri, Scientific Director of Wakanda. But Grace D. GipsonPh.D., a pop culture scholar and future black feminist who studies representation around race and gender in comics, music, film and television, knows the real answer: her name is Lunala Lafayetteaka Moon Girl, and she’s “a super awesome 9-year-old black girl.”

The release of blockbuster superhero films centered on black protagonists, including 2018’s “Black Panther” and its sequel which premieres Friday, has reignited conversations about the importance of representation in Hollywood and pop culture, which that Gipson is studying as an assistant professor at the Department of African American Studies at Virginia Commonwealth University College of Humanities and Sciences. Pop culture, she says, has a hold on all of us, and representation in pop culture changes our perceptions and how we interact in society.

“Representation is essential and important because what we see in pop culture influences and provides insight into how we make decisions, how we see things, how things are represented, and people are represented,” says Gipson. “If there is a limited view of black girls and women (in pop culture), then there will be a limited view of how we exist (in society).”

“An opportunity to feel seen”

Gipson studies Afrofuturism, a framework for imagining black futures and redefining the experience of people in the African diaspora through science, technology and the arts, at its intersection with pop culture. She explores the inescapable influence of fantasy, fiction and pop culture on society and vice versa.

Gipson’s current book project, “Reclaiming Her Time: Exploring Black Female Experiences and Identities in Comics and Graphic Novels,” explores the layered identities and experiences of various fictional black female characters as personified in comic books. and fandom culture, as well as their relationship to real-life situations.

Take Moon Girl, for example. Her story gives millions of young black girls more opportunities to see someone like them inventing things and experimenting with science. It helps them see a future in a STEM field more clearly, says Gipson, a place where Black girls and women are generally underrepresented.

“Stories like Lunella’s in the comic book genre are not only remarkable, but crucial in helping to bridge the gap between fiction and real-world application,” Gipson wrote in an article. chronicle of 2017, “The Future is Black and Female: Afrofuturism and Comicsfor the African American Intellectual History Society. “In addition to raising awareness of the inadequacies of STEM, the character also presents a humanized experience of young black girls while celebrating their intelligence.”

Representation of race and gender in comics, music, movies, television – really any media people can consume – can have a real and positive impact on how people view themselves and people. others.

“Lunella really changed the game in terms of what a superhero can look like,” Gipson told VCU News. “What I love about her story is that it offers the opportunity to feel seen. I didn’t have Lunella when I started reading comics, and so knowing that she exists now, my nieces and nephews can tell there is someone who makes them feel seen.

“Reading her story, I go back to that little girl that I was when I first walked in, and that’s promising because before it was like, ‘I don’t see anyone like me. ‘”

Grace Gipson, Ph.D., assistant professor of African American studies in VCU’s College of Humanities, fell in love with comics as a youngster. Now she studies the representation of race and gender in comics and pop culture, as well as pop culture as an educational tool, and how representations in pop culture influence prejudice in society. (Tom Kojcsich, Marketing and Corporate Communications)

Gipson’s research into representation in pop culture grew out of his natural curiosity about the world — and an early love of comics, comics, and cartoons. She started reading ‘the funny ones’ in her grandmother’s diary at the age of 4 and, in elementary school, turned to comic books, ‘Archie’ and ‘X-Men’ among his first. She saw herself in Storm, a black superheroine, from “X-Men”.

But, there were many more places in pop culture that she didn’t see on her own. As a black girl growing up in Champaign, Illinois during the 1980s and 1990s, Gipson felt she had to hide her passion for comic books. Hollywood’s portrayal of “comic book nerds” at the time was unlike him.

“I didn’t want to be considered a nerd, I didn’t want to be considered a geek, and that was the association that came with the comics. It’s funny because people are going to tell me now, “I didn’t realize you were in comics back then”, but as a 5, 6, 10 year old black girl at the time , we were not represented in this way . I didn’t see anyone who looked like me, so I didn’t want to be part of it,” Gipson says. “I will be grateful and happy if someone calls me a ‘nerd black girl’ now; I hug him. But the 80s, 90s? No, it wasn’t the cool thing to be seen like that. And a lot of that is because pop culture has a particular stereotype about how nerds look.

Pop culture, ‘Black Panther’ and how we see ourselves and others

Pop culture plays a role in creating and reinforcing stereotypes, which can be harmful when it comes to prejudice in society. The recent backlash against the casting of Halle Bailey, a black actress and singer, in the upcoming live-action rendition of “The Little Mermaid” as Ariel (pictured in the 1989 cartoon in white) is just that. an example.

“You have a situation like ‘The Little Mermaid,’ where people have such vitriol about the casting that it makes you wonder, ‘So can’t black girls be mermaids? Can’t they exist in fantasy? Is our only position to be in this present state that is very limited or defined by past examples? “Says Gipson.

But pop culture can also be an educational tool to help people explore their biases. Gipson says the 2018 hit movie “Black Panther” did just that. It changed the perceptions of all viewers — whether they looked like the cast or not — on everything from body image and leadership to race and gender in general.

“Black Panther” changed the way black girls and women see themselves on screen, according to Gipson, highlighting the positive impacts of portrayal in fiction. The film, she says, “put #BlackGirlMagic on the map,” encouraging black women to celebrate themselves more as leaders on social media, and redefined how black women are personified in film, from hairstyles and costumes to leadership roles in politics and technology.

Gipson says she also saw changes in Hollywood as a result of the film, such as giving viewers greater permission to call out Hollywood when portrayals of black characters in new movies are problematic. This caused Hollywood to prioritize representation in writers’ rooms, which it noted when releasing another Marvel movie “Shang-Chi.” in a 2021 interview with CNN. And, she says, it’s changed studios’ perceptions of how movies that focus on black characters and narratives will be viewed by non-black audiences.

“‘Black Panther’ changed the game of saying what can and does sell,” says Gipson. “It wasn’t just black people who went to see ‘Black Panther; everyone — everyone — went to see him. If we think of the best box office movies, Black Panther is in that top 10, selling billions worldwide. That in itself is a reason to say that it changed the landscape, it changed the way we look at media.

“I’m a big movie buff and I can see new genres exploring black cultural experiences, from religion to fantasy like with ‘A Wrinkle in Time’ and ‘Honk for Jesus’. Save Your Soul.’ – there are so many more genres now that are engaging with the black experience, in the black diaspora experience, I will always have hope that the representation will be there and that the film industry is in the process of to change.

She predicts that Hollywood – and the media – will see another change after “Black Panther: Wakanda Forever” is released. The film will focus on the stories of black female leaders – Wakandan Princess Shuri, Nakia, Okoye and Ramonda, to name a few – and indigenous people – Namor, the leader of an ancient civilization linked to the Maya.

“Now we’re going to get even more color, both literally and figuratively,” says Gipson. “We’re going to see the stories of many people on screen who have never been on the big screen before.”

Gipson says representation in pop culture, especially in fiction, is important when considering how cultural images can fuel bias. Better representation in Hollywood when making movies is a big part of that. But expanding perspectives around representation in pop culture and fiction will help society rewrite narratives about race and gender for current and future generations.

“I remember very early on, when Hollywood studios were talking about making the ‘Black Panther’ movie and how they were trying to figure out, ‘Well, how do we make Wakanda?’ And I remember saying to someone, ‘Well, how did you all make Asgard? If you can make Asgard, you can make Wakanda.'” Gipson said. “Seeing a movie come to fruition like ‘Black Panther’ is definitely one of the reasons I’m so happy to study and talk about representation.”